Field Notes – share the love

We love Field Notes notebooks and we love print and this video shows why.

That’s the way to promote your product: show people you love what you do and that you’re competent at it.

Jon Jackson’s Adios LA

When artist Jon Jackson, a longtime Los Angeles resident, made plans to relocate to Noo Yoik, he didn’t want “to string LA along” and so “decided to firmly break it off through a graphic billboard series posted on the famous streets of his first love”!

Needless to say, the City of the Angels hasn’t seen anything quite like Johnson’s series since Elektra Records broke the mainstream hold on LA’s billboards with their revolutionary paste-ups for The Doors’ debut album and Love’s “Forever Changes” set in 1966-67.

You can check out Jackson’s full series here.

Herb Lester Associates

Guardian Guide creator Ben Olins’ latest project, in partnership with Jane Smillie, is the self-effacingly great Herb Lester Associates, who have produced a number of gorgeous, fold-up maps designed by Montana’s Michael Newhouse.

You Are Here is a pocket-sized guide to London’s best spots for freelancers to hold meetings and work, May We Help You? details the captial’s best specialist suppliers, and their latest, Wish You Were There, is a look at the city’s hottest shops and entertainments, circa 1960-1966. The maps are available for £3-4 each here.

Ligature, Loop & Stem Poster

Every now and again someone sends me a link that literally makes my jaw drop. Check out this amazing letter press typography poster from Scott Boms, Grant Hutchinson and Luke Dorny, printed by Lunar Caustic Press. Want one? No chance. Limited edition of 100 must have sold out in minutes.

Ligature, Loop & Stem Poster

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“Just My Type” of Christmas present

Slightly wayward but undeniably brilliant social chronicler Simon Garfield has got a new tome out, “Just My Type: A Book About Fonts” (Profile Books), which is a surefire Xmess winner for anyone with even a modicum of interest in design and the peeps behind it. If it’s a quarter as good as his masterful history of British grappling in the 1970s, “The Wrestling” (Faber), then “Just My Type” will be a hugely enjoyable read. Here’s the blurb:

“Just My Type is a book of stories. About how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. About why Barack Obama opted for Gotham, while Amy Winehouse found her soul in 30s Art Deco. About the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, or people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook, or Margaret Calvert, who invented the motorway signs that are used from Watford Gap to Abu Dhabi. About the pivotal moment when fonts left the world of Letraset and were loaded onto computers … and typefaces became something we realized we all have an opinion about.”

Letterpress heaven – Hatch Show Print, Nashville

Opened in Nashville by brothers Herbert and Charles Hatch in 1879, Hatch Show Print is America’s oldest printing business and is still creating beautiful letterpress posters and handbills using its huge library of hand-cut blocks. From Elvis, Johnny Cash and Hank Williams, to The White Stripes and REM, Hatch has advertised ’em all. And as Hatch still turns out around 600 print jobs each year, t’ain’t goin’ anyplace soon, bub…

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The 45 sleeve — packaging as art

“Sleeves were designed originally to serve as a protective device for records and labels during shipment. In the case of “45” rpm records, however, a device of this nature becomes unnecessary. The raised label area on 45’s fully prevents any harmful contact between the grooved surfaces of records during shipment. Paper separators – such as this sheet – are designed to protect record labels during shipment. They have no other useful function and may be discarded at your convenience…”

Sage record care advice from the folks at RCA Victor, circa 1952.

As you can see from the small selection of 45 sleeves shown above, thankfully, the rest of the music industry — and, indeed, RCA itself — didn’t share this rather quite touching faith in the durability of the company’s new vinyl medium, and quickly turned the humble shipping protector into an art form in its own right.

RCA’s numpty claim is very redolent of those made on behalf of the CD when it was first introduced — most famously on a 1981 episode of the popular TV science show, Tomorrow’s World, wherein the presenters happily smeared a shiny biscuit with jam, then wiped it off and played it, as if proving that it was virtually indestructible! And we know how that ended…

If Comic Sans Could Speak

McSweeney’s is a brilliant site at the best of times but this imagined sideswipe at designer elitism from Comic Sans is genius.

WARNING TREMENDOUS AMOUNT OF POTTY-MOUTHED LANGUAGE

Sample Quote:
It doesn’t even matter what you think. You know why, jagoff? Cause I’m famous. I am on every major operating system since Microsoft @£$%ing Bob. I’m in your signs. I’m in your browsers. I’m in your instant messengers. I’m not just a font. I am a force of mother@£$%ing nature and I will not rest until every uptight armchair typographer @£$%-hat like you is surrounded by my lovable, comic-book inspired, sans-serif badassery.

You know what? I still hate Comic Sans.

Designers all still at lunch? Choose a typeface the easy way…

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The Book Cover Archive

If you like design and books and typefaces and imagery and reading then the Book Cover Archive is a great place to spend a little time. In the meantime here are a few of our favourites.

That’ll be the decade then!

Everything noughties in one lovely table.

Picturing the past ten years

Learning French through great design

Caroline Fabès is a freelance graphic designer who has created a great little typographical animation for a key scene in Raging Bull

This is the actual scene. With pictures.

Letterpress stop motion

Here’s a beautiful video following the process of printing a book and binding it. Made up of over 300 photographs, it’s a fascinating insight in to the world of letterpress.

Creative erm… Barcodes?

Thanks to Neil Mohr for these amazing barcodes from Japanese design company d-barcode.com

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“Left v Right” graphic

obviously alot of this is utter rubbish but it looks nice… could work for other ‘subjects’. ie: football teams, countries, xbox v ps3, business models, markets, etc

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/leftvright_world.htmlleftvright

It’s The Perpetual Pin Badge Fridge Magnet Calendar

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This is another one of those amazingly/annoyingly simple ideas that just work. Pin badge sized fridge magnets that act as a calendar. This won a graphic design award at the Kiev International Advertising Festival and should, hope fully be hitting the shops soonish.

Yorkshire Saucery. Trickery.

This new work for Yorkshire Saucery  by Shark! sums up everything I love about the smoke and mirrors you can create with packaging. The yellowing paper and hand written font says ‘home made’. The quote  and signature from the ‘chef’ tells you this was lovingly created by one man just for you, hell there’s even a photo of him, Jon’s his name. And the best bit, it’s exclusive to ASDA, one of the biggest supermarkets in the country. That Jon must be a busy man.

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Fontplore

Search and explore fonts Minority Report style. Not convinced myself, but it looks pretty.

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More Beautiful Letterpress

This time from Boxcar Press in Chicago, check out their portfolio, and flickr stream

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Inky Calendar

An ingenious idea by Oscar Diaz. Here’s how he describes it…

“Ink Calendar make use of the timed pace of the ink spreading on the paper to indicate time. The ink is absorbed slowly, and the numbers in the calendar are ‘printed ‘ daily. One a day, they are filled with ink until the end of the month. The calendar enhances the perception of time passing and not only signaling it.  The aim of the project is to address our senses, rather than the logical and conscious brain.”

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Check it out here. And more of Oscars work here.

Lino cut

This is what Mark Webber has been working on for the past 6 months, a massive typographic map of Paris.

He has more stunning Lino prints on his website.

A different way to look at copy

Word clouds are nothing new, but  wordle is an easy, fun way to create them. You can play with the number of ‘hot words’ used, the colour set, orientation of the words… there are also a funky set of fonts on offer. But the real reason for my post is this: have you ever thought of creating a word cloud to see copy you’ve written in a new light? Since the relative size of words within the cloud is dictated by its frequency in the excerpt you use, it’s a leftfield way of keeping an eye on repetition, or even just to get a feel for the kind of language you’ve been using. Try it.

Word Cloud

Word Cloud