Back to the future?

Taking an early lead from the reissued Big Trak toy in the retro tech stakes is a ‘reimagining’ of the Commodore 64 as a “modern functional PC as close to the original in design as humanly possible. It houses a modern mini-ITX PC motherboard featuring a Dual Core 525 Atom processor and the latest Nvidia Ion2 graphics chipset. It comes in the original taupe brown/beige color, with other colors to follow… No expense has been spared. This is the ultimate hackers keyboard on which to wield your key-fu.”

Suffice to say, a revamped version of the Sinclair C5 that’ll do a ton up the bypass is now looking more likely!

Kinect

For the uninitiated, Microsoft’s Kinect is an add-on for the Xbox 360 which is kind of a super-advanced version of Nintendo’s Wiimote. No controller is needed, for example, and it recognises faces, voices, phrases, gestures, whole body movements, etc.

This interesting talk by Peter Molyneux about some of the possibilities of Kinect is brought to life by Milo, a youngster/tech demo whom people who saw the early demos of the device will recognise.

Near the end of the talk, Molyneux casually mentions that Milo’s mind exists in the cloud, meaning that the more people who interact with him worldwide, the more intelligent he gets. Presumably measures have been put in place so he doesn’t then, say, take over the world.

Via Engadget.

Genius retro gaming wall stickers!

Now this might just be a boy thing, but how good are theses Atari wall stickers? Available for single nerds to buy here.

Shall we get some for the FuturePlus office?

DIY Internet Chess Table

It’s chess on the internet, and also real life. Ace.

Via Engadget.

What Japanese kids do at school

Did you ever do anything this good the whole time you were at school?

Sure I built Bradford-on-Avon’s Saxon church out of cardboard, but I never made an awesome stop motion Mario run round my classroom.

Pixels by Patrick Jean

Pixels is Patrick Jean’s new short showing an invasion of New York by ’80’s videogame characters. Click here to view it.

Google Pac-Man costs 4.82 million productivity hours in one day

When Google launched its playable Pac-Man 30th anniversary Google Doodle last Friday, they thought it might be popular, but not quadruple visit times!
RescueTime, makers of productivity tracking and optimisation software found the following…
• 4,819,352 hours of time lost. This is above the 33.6 million man hours of attention Google gets on a regular day.
• More than $120 million in lost productivity, assuming the cost of the average Google user is $25 an hour (that’s pay plus benefits).
• For that same cost, you could hire all 19,835 google employees, from Larry and Sergey down to their janitors, and get 6 weeks of their time.

Thanks Kotaku