Cool posters

C30, C60, C90 go!

Far from disappearing, the humble compact cassette has found fresh favour on the DIY music scene, with the return of tape-only labels being one of the most surprising developments of recent years. However, taking into account the digital ‘loudness wars’ eloquently deliniated in Greg Milner’s Perfecting Sound Forever, which saw the likes of Metallica’s huge fanbase lambasting the ‘everything louder than everything else’ approach, mebbe the humble analogue cassette’s ability to absorb serious overloading and sound simply triffic makes more sense… and then there’s the excellent blank tape insert art, as reflected by this excellent Flickr set.

Sliced Pixels

With this technique Victor van Gaasbeek used the most basic elements in todays graphic design; the pixel.

The pixels were sliced in half, and with the sliced pixels created numerous animal heads. Up-close all you see is triangles, but when you look from a distance, the big picture becomes clear. Check out Victor’s site @ victorvangaasbeek.com

Mister Freedom — history and design in harmony

Following on from the hot 2010 trend for American workwear that we blogged about, transplanted French designer Christophe Loiron has started a new style digression with his California-based brand Mister Freedom‘s Spring 2011 collection, Les Apaches.

Taking inspiration from Parisien hoodlum kultchur of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Loiron’s really gone to town on this homage to his home country’s organic street style. The attention to detail is astonishing, not least this beautiful, specially-commissioned shirt box, painted by Patrick Segui. Expect the influence of the Les Apaches collection to be felt on UK high streets next year — minus the packaging!

Monkee Business — coining it in…

Monkee Business, Eric Lefcowitz’s new tome about the world’s first boyband, is now available in a nifty limited edition run of 300 copies that feature a die-cut cover inset with double-sided coins depicting the respective noggins of Messrs Nesmith, Tork, Jones and Dolenz, as used on the regular paperback shown below. The limited edition is available here.

Letterpress heaven – Hatch Show Print, Nashville

Opened in Nashville by brothers Herbert and Charles Hatch in 1879, Hatch Show Print is America’s oldest printing business and is still creating beautiful letterpress posters and handbills using its huge library of hand-cut blocks. From Elvis, Johnny Cash and Hank Williams, to The White Stripes and REM, Hatch has advertised ’em all. And as Hatch still turns out around 600 print jobs each year, t’ain’t goin’ anyplace soon, bub…

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Great film posters

We first became aware of this guy’s work when Hollywood director Jon Favreau tweeted a hand drawn poster for Iron Man II earlier this year.

The illustrator’s name is Tyler Stout, who hails from Washington in the States. He’s spent years caught up watching films and honing his craft, and it’s through this focus that you can see why he didn’t have a girlfriend until he was in his early 20s.

But it’s that kind of love for the subject matter that’s paid off in his later life, getting commissions to produce brilliantly observed re-imagings of current and classic movie posters.

We’re hugely keen on his ‘Kuato Lives’ Total Recall poster – the ‘two weeeeeeeeeks’ head is great – but all of his posters bring something to the party that hasn’t been seen in film posters for years.

Let’s hope we see a return to these sorts of promo values in the near future – all of our lives would be the better for it.

For more of Tyler’s work, stop by at his website – you may even be able to pick yourself up a print, but you’ll need to be quick!

From Russia with stuff

And good stuff at that. Dmitry Raspopov has worked on lots of nice things for Russia’s Secret Firmy and Interni magazines.

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The 45 sleeve — packaging as art

“Sleeves were designed originally to serve as a protective device for records and labels during shipment. In the case of “45” rpm records, however, a device of this nature becomes unnecessary. The raised label area on 45’s fully prevents any harmful contact between the grooved surfaces of records during shipment. Paper separators – such as this sheet – are designed to protect record labels during shipment. They have no other useful function and may be discarded at your convenience…”

Sage record care advice from the folks at RCA Victor, circa 1952.

As you can see from the small selection of 45 sleeves shown above, thankfully, the rest of the music industry — and, indeed, RCA itself — didn’t share this rather quite touching faith in the durability of the company’s new vinyl medium, and quickly turned the humble shipping protector into an art form in its own right.

RCA’s numpty claim is very redolent of those made on behalf of the CD when it was first introduced — most famously on a 1981 episode of the popular TV science show, Tomorrow’s World, wherein the presenters happily smeared a shiny biscuit with jam, then wiped it off and played it, as if proving that it was virtually indestructible! And we know how that ended…

2010 Social Networking World Map

Every world needs a map so why should the world of social networking be any different? Bear in mind that just five years ago Facebook wouldn’t have even been on here! Great stats and actually made me laugh (although I am a proper nerd, so keep those comedy expectations low Muggles). Click image to embiggen…

Stunning future vintage ads

These gorgeous retro ads were created by Moma Propaganda for the ‘Everything Ages Fast’ ad campaign. Ridiculous as it seems, these four internet powerhouses WILL seems antiquated in about 10 years. Enjoy.



Creative duvet covers

Following on from the other week’s highly successful Creative Mugs blog – it inspired us to buy some new office mugs at least – we’ve decided to make something of a series out of it. This week we’ve collected together some of our favourite duvet covers.

We’re deliberately not linking to any purchasing pages, as we’re into kick-starting ideas rather than shifting product for people.

Of this collection, we’re great fans of the Twister spread, and are particularly keen on the iPhone print – although it’s no coincidence that’s for a single bed!

Anyway, without further ado…

“Sorry, sir, there’s no call for letterheads anymore…”

Farenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury's letterhead, circa 1950s

With the predominance of email comms, letterheads have become almost an afterthought. But until the 21stC, they were an important part of the comms kit of businesses, creatives, the great and the, um, deffo not so… A cool blog, Letterheady, features a cornucopia of letterheads, from the overweeningly self-promoting to the understated. Here are just a few examples, from the sublime to the dangerous…

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Zimbardo – The Secret Powers of Time

There are three things worth noting about this short film.

1 There’s an innovative theory on how different people and cultures view the world.

2 It’s really well animated.

3 This Zimbardo man is the famous chap behind the Stanford Prison Experiment

Gorgeous interactive World Cup calendar

Very pleasing Flash World Cup calendar.

And a slightly less successful version for World Cup 94…

Ski Williams — extreme hand-lettering and illustration

In this age of digital derring-do, it’s easy for bands to put together great-looking gig flyers, posters and artwork for their releases. However, sometimes, there’s no substitute for extreme hand-lettering and illustration. With the prices of original 1960s rock posters by such artists as Rick Griffin, Stanley Mouse and Wes Wilson still rising in value (especially since the publication of The Art of Rock), and modern works by the likes of Coop and Kozik attracting serious attention (they’re documented in Art of Modern Rock), it’s time to praise the UK’s greatest current poster artist, Ski Williams.

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Movies in 6 frames

Little White Lies magazine just held a competition for readers to draw their favourite movies in six comic book frames. There are some humorous results, but I particularly liked the few below. You can view more at the Creative Review Blog site here and subscribe to Little White Lies here.


“Seven” by Mat Bond (runner up)


“2001” by Rich Johnston


“The Wicker Man” by Hurk

Kapow! Batman onomatopoeias

Check out this alphabetically ordered gallery of Batman onomatopoeias. Yeah, one of those.

I’m sure we all remember the likes of ‘KAPOW!’ and ‘WHACK!’, but what about ‘BAP!’, ‘VRONK!’, and ‘ZGRUPPP!’?

(Via It’s Nice That)

The Oil Spill Disaster Facts – at a glance

The thing about infographics, such as this one from Infographic World is that, when they’re done right they deliver information at breakneck speed. Even if this isn’t information you enjoy reading – such as this instant analysis of the current oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.

Infographics explain the complex quickly, even if the facts are grim

Innapropriate children’s books – The Book!

Pixar story artist, Josh Cooley, has been creating his collection of Innapropriate Golden Books (a beloved US kiddie book range – think Ladybird) for the last two years. What has he done with this collection? Made a book of course. Check out some samples…





“Next stop… Anus.”

Quite a nice illustration by Sam Loman who’s drawn the human body in the style of the London underground tube map.

Thanks to Good Magazine.

Information IS Beautiful (And Alarming)

David McCandless and the team at Information Is Beautiful do a wonderful job of interpreting data within a graphic framework, taking often quite complex issues and simplifying them into the visual equiv of a soft caress, followed by a slap in the kisser.

Here’s two recent, disparate examples of their work. Click on the images for larger versions…

Planes or Volcano?

How Much Do Music Artists Earn Online?

Magnificent hand-drawn map of London

Check out the ridiculous detail here.

Check out full zoom!

Re-Skinned Buldings

Messing with people’s perspective by projecting images over buildings is all the rage in 2010, it’s still new enough to be impressive though.

Alice For The iPad

“Just how,” people inquire, earnestly and with furrowed brows, “just how will the iPad make reading different?”

If you get an earnest, brow-furrowed inquiry simply thrust this in their phiz, it’s brilliant!

There’s a making of interview on the just-launched The Literary Platform.

Volkswagen Independent Cinema Sponsorship Ads

By DDB London, try and guess the films, and don’t cheat by looking at the filenames.

Parkour Flip Book – Extreme Animation

This works brilliantly, it’s fresh, captures the dynamism of the pastime and it’s just about torn paper…

That’ll be the decade then!

Everything noughties in one lovely table.

Picturing the past ten years

Pop Culture Retreads

There has been trend in 2009 for designers to take slices of popular culture and mash them up with old skool design. It looks like it’s an idea that isn’t running out of steam any time soon as Stéphane Massa-Bidal has shown with the latest incarnation – his series of internet phenoms as 1960’s style Pelican Classics.

Olly Moss was the first one out of the blocks with his revamped film posters and video games as books – all very Saul Bass.

M S Corley gave us books as, wait for it… books. Again heavily influenced by Bass.

It’s a great way for great designers to stretch their legs, but then no one is saying the originals weren’t brilliant either, right? Go here to see a great Pelican books resource.