C30, C60, C90 go!

Far from disappearing, the humble compact cassette has found fresh favour on the DIY music scene, with the return of tape-only labels being one of the most surprising developments of recent years. However, taking into account the digital ‘loudness wars’ eloquently deliniated in Greg Milner’s Perfecting Sound Forever, which saw the likes of Metallica’s huge fanbase lambasting the ‘everything louder than everything else’ approach, mebbe the humble analogue cassette’s ability to absorb serious overloading and sound simply triffic makes more sense… and then there’s the excellent blank tape insert art, as reflected by this excellent Flickr set.

Jon Jackson’s Adios LA

When artist Jon Jackson, a longtime Los Angeles resident, made plans to relocate to Noo Yoik, he didn’t want “to string LA along” and so “decided to firmly break it off through a graphic billboard series posted on the famous streets of his first love”!

Needless to say, the City of the Angels hasn’t seen anything quite like Johnson’s series since Elektra Records broke the mainstream hold on LA’s billboards with their revolutionary paste-ups for The Doors’ debut album and Love’s “Forever Changes” set in 1966-67.

You can check out Jackson’s full series here.

Herb Lester Associates

Guardian Guide creator Ben Olins’ latest project, in partnership with Jane Smillie, is the self-effacingly great Herb Lester Associates, who have produced a number of gorgeous, fold-up maps designed by Montana’s Michael Newhouse.

You Are Here is a pocket-sized guide to London’s best spots for freelancers to hold meetings and work, May We Help You? details the captial’s best specialist suppliers, and their latest, Wish You Were There, is a look at the city’s hottest shops and entertainments, circa 1960-1966. The maps are available for £3-4 each here.

The most creative annual report ever?

Wondering how Sainsbury’s have been performing in 2010? You betcha!!
Excited about downloading the latest 200 page annual report pdf? Then you’re going to explode when you see their 3D interactive Sims-style store, complete with shopping list of the year’s performance.
Brilliant solution to a largely dull subject. Click the image to visit the report.

The Times’ iPad Infographics

Great interactive infographics from Applied Works for The Times’ £9.99 iPad app. Video below…

“Sorry, sir, there’s no call for letterheads anymore…”

Farenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury's letterhead, circa 1950s

With the predominance of email comms, letterheads have become almost an afterthought. But until the 21stC, they were an important part of the comms kit of businesses, creatives, the great and the, um, deffo not so… A cool blog, Letterheady, features a cornucopia of letterheads, from the overweeningly self-promoting to the understated. Here are just a few examples, from the sublime to the dangerous…

Continue reading

Twitter traffic as contoured landscape

There’s a piece over at the Londonist which has alerted us to this brilliant map.

Created by Fabian Neuhaus, at UCL’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, it shows London Twitter traffic as a contoured landscape.

It’s really cool stuff, and we especially like the detail of renaming London’s zones to reflect that they’re now peaks and valleys – Deptford Tor being a particular favourite.

Nauhaus is creating some fantastic stuff on his UrbanTick blog, which is well worth a few minutes of your time, if this Twitter map has got you all a bit excited.

Zimbardo – The Secret Powers of Time

There are three things worth noting about this short film.

1 There’s an innovative theory on how different people and cultures view the world.

2 It’s really well animated.

3 This Zimbardo man is the famous chap behind the Stanford Prison Experiment

Gorgeous interactive World Cup calendar

Very pleasing Flash World Cup calendar.

And a slightly less successful version for World Cup 94…

The Oil Spill Disaster Facts – at a glance

The thing about infographics, such as this one from Infographic World is that, when they’re done right they deliver information at breakneck speed. Even if this isn’t information you enjoy reading – such as this instant analysis of the current oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.

Infographics explain the complex quickly, even if the facts are grim

“Next stop… Anus.”

Quite a nice illustration by Sam Loman who’s drawn the human body in the style of the London underground tube map.

Thanks to Good Magazine.

Information IS Beautiful (And Alarming)

David McCandless and the team at Information Is Beautiful do a wonderful job of interpreting data within a graphic framework, taking often quite complex issues and simplifying them into the visual equiv of a soft caress, followed by a slap in the kisser.

Here’s two recent, disparate examples of their work. Click on the images for larger versions…

Planes or Volcano?

How Much Do Music Artists Earn Online?

Designers all still at lunch? Choose a typeface the easy way…

Click to enlarge

Hans Rosling on TED.com

I have never seen data presented quite like this, pure genius.

That’ll be the decade then!

Everything noughties in one lovely table.

Picturing the past ten years

Infographic Music Video

Great Video by Norwegian group Röyksopp

ryk_01

ryk_02

Random Cutaway Illustration

Totally random image of a cutaway VW camper, beautiful!

 

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VW Camper Cutaway Illustration

 

 

“Left v Right” graphic

obviously alot of this is utter rubbish but it looks nice… could work for other ‘subjects’. ie: football teams, countries, xbox v ps3, business models, markets, etc

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/leftvright_world.htmlleftvright

Telstar – Flight Thru Instruments

Wonderful Naval flight instruction manual from 1945, beautifully simple infographics, actually make flight seem quite straightforward. Flickr gallery here, and more explanantion here…

Telstar Flight Thru Instruments

Telstar Flight Thru Instruments

Telstar Flight Thru Instruments

Telstar Flight Thru Instruments

Lino cut

This is what Mark Webber has been working on for the past 6 months, a massive typographic map of Paris.

He has more stunning Lino prints on his website.

A different way to look at copy

Word clouds are nothing new, but  wordle is an easy, fun way to create them. You can play with the number of ‘hot words’ used, the colour set, orientation of the words… there are also a funky set of fonts on offer. But the real reason for my post is this: have you ever thought of creating a word cloud to see copy you’ve written in a new light? Since the relative size of words within the cloud is dictated by its frequency in the excerpt you use, it’s a leftfield way of keeping an eye on repetition, or even just to get a feel for the kind of language you’ve been using. Try it.

Word Cloud

Word Cloud

Space Shuttle Infographic

Look at the rendering!

A BBC Ceefax infographic from 1981, beautiful for its simplicity, and the limitations of the medium. 
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