Clone yourself silly…

An enterprising Japanese firm, Clone Factory, have taken cutting edge 3D mapping and printing technologies in another direction entirely, by making it possible to have your head cloned onto a doll of your choosing, such as the unusually cheery Imperial Stormtrooper shown above!

The subject simply takes a seat in the photo studio, where they’re snapped’n’scanned, then a 3D model of their noggin is rendered…

The 3D model is then printed onto a sheet of clay-like material, which is trimmed and coloured, before being fitted to the body of your choice…

The results are scarily accurate!

Cool posters

Got plenty of toner and some time on your hands?

Just print out 285 pages to create 750 parts, put aside 245 hours and you too could have your own papercraft scale model 2012 Audi A7!

C30, C60, C90 go!

Far from disappearing, the humble compact cassette has found fresh favour on the DIY music scene, with the return of tape-only labels being one of the most surprising developments of recent years. However, taking into account the digital ‘loudness wars’ eloquently deliniated in Greg Milner’s Perfecting Sound Forever, which saw the likes of Metallica’s huge fanbase lambasting the ‘everything louder than everything else’ approach, mebbe the humble analogue cassette’s ability to absorb serious overloading and sound simply triffic makes more sense… and then there’s the excellent blank tape insert art, as reflected by this excellent Flickr set.

Sliced Pixels

With this technique Victor van Gaasbeek used the most basic elements in todays graphic design; the pixel.

The pixels were sliced in half, and with the sliced pixels created numerous animal heads. Up-close all you see is triangles, but when you look from a distance, the big picture becomes clear. Check out Victor’s site @ victorvangaasbeek.com

IBM: Smarter Planet

These ads were made for IBM and their project ‘Smarter Planet‘. Ads created by Ogilvy South Africa,

Filthy Media Stationary

I could eat this. Beautiful design and print for Filthy Media’s stationary.